Goodbye from The Public Intellectual
August 19, 2012 – 2:43 pm | 3 Comments

The Public Intellectual has been for us a fascinating experiment in bringing academic work to a general audience. We are very proud of the writing that has appeared on the site. We have been heartened by the support of our readers and the generosity of the writers who have worked with us since our launch last year. We have decided, however, that the project should end.

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Articles in Think Again

Color Us Invisible
January 19, 2012 – 3:36 pm | No Comment
Color Us Invisible

By Mignon Moore

LGBT people of color are simultaneously present and excluded in the neighborhoods where they live and in mainstream LGBT organizations. They might be more active in promoting LGBT advocacy efforts if they felt those efforts included their voices and incorporated more of the issues that are important to them.

OWS: A 21st Century Revolution
October 20, 2011 – 6:26 pm | No Comment
OWS: A 21st Century Revolution

We shouldn’t be surprised that the occupiers don’t have a nicely polished plan of action, says Mary Keck. In fact, the openness to evolving platforms and solutions may be its greatest asset. Keck is an instructor of English and Gender Studies as well as an associate editor of Southern Indiana Review. As a freelance journalist and fiction writer, she explores issues of class, labor, and gender in contemporary American life.

Unequal denial
October 6, 2011 – 5:49 pm | 3 Comments
Unequal denial

Can we control rising inequality? Claude Fischer asks that question here. Fischer is professor of sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. He was the founding editor of Contexts, the American Sociological Association’s magazine of sociology for the general reader, and edited it through 2004.

The spiritual life of the American teenager
August 4, 2011 – 4:26 pm | One Comment
The spiritual life of the American teenager

The vision of the rebel-without-a-cause-adolescent, where young people reject the mores and values of mainstream culture, is just one of the stereotypes challenged by Lisa Pearce and Melinda Lundquist Denton’s study of young people and religion. Also on the chopping block: the idea that the most religious people are the happiest people. Their book, A Faith of Their Own, was published by Oxford University Press earlier this year.

The case of the “killer lesbians”
July 18, 2011 – 8:38 pm | 9 Comments
The case of the “killer lesbians”

Several African-American lesbians who fought back against an alleged attack were incarcerated after convictions resulting from the incident. Laura S. Logan looks at how press coverage of the group, dubbed the New Jersey 7, shaped a narrative about the women that portrayed them as predators rather than victims – a story at odds with how we usually think about LGBT people who’ve been harassed.

Graduating Women
June 27, 2011 – 3:11 am | One Comment
Graduating Women

Why did women’s graduation rates overtake men’s in the 1970s? Claude Fischer considers some possible answers to this question. Fischer is professor of sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. He was the founding editor of Contexts, the American Sociological Association’s magazine of sociology for the general reader, and edited it through 2004.

It’s complicated – Latina, transgender and born again
June 27, 2011 – 3:09 am | No Comment
It’s complicated – Latina, transgender and born again

Lucia Perez, who is transitioning from male to female, looks for a new life – one that she can embrace without leaving her family or her church behind. Rosa Ramirez brings us her story. Rosa is a journalist based in the Bay Area. She’s covered immigration, crime and the courts, and breaking news for various publications across the country. She’s currently completing a master’s in Latin American studies at the University of California, Berkeley, where she recently completed her master’s in journalism.

The big change
June 8, 2011 – 6:47 pm | One Comment
The big change

The emergence of working women changed the world in the 20th century. Claude Fischer looks at the magnitude of this shift. Fischer is professor of sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. He was the founding editor of Contexts, the American Sociological Association’s magazine of sociology for the general reader, and edited it through 2004. The article is a preview of PI’s next themed issue on gender, coming in July.

A crime puzzle
May 2, 2011 – 12:05 am | 13 Comments
A crime puzzle

Why does violent crime continue to drop in the US, even as the economy tanks and inequality increases? Sociologist Claude Fischer ponders this crime puzzle. Fischer is professor of sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. He was the founding editor of Contexts, the American Sociological Association’s magazine of sociology for the general reader, and edited it through 2004.

From the criminal justice dustbin
May 2, 2011 – 12:00 am | No Comment
From the criminal justice dustbin

By Heather Tirado Gilligan
Beyond Scared Straight, an A&E reality TV show, films at-risk kids who are taken to prisons as part of a diversion program. The show, directed by Arnold Shapiro – who also directed …